Mesquite Burl Pulls Down Record-Setting Large Tree for Unique Lumber
posted on December 1, 2009 by Joanna Takes
Mesquite wood piece filled with black epoxy Mesquite Burl takes their lumber inconsistencies and all, filling the natural divots in the mesquite with black epoxy, creating an attractive contrast with the amber wood.

Everything’s bigger in Texas, so the saying goes — and the mesquite tree harvested earlier this year near Floresville certainly fits the bill. While it’s impossible to say whether it’s the biggest mesquite tree ever harvested, according to Bob Brown of the Mesquite Burl company, “we think it’s one of the largest.”

Mesquite Burl's record setting mesquite tree The giant mesquite tree Mesquite Burl pulled down was never confirmed to be the world's biggest, but it was certainly massive and produced a lot of lumber.

“It took two forklifts, struggling and grunting, an hour just to get it off the truck,” Bob said — not surprising when its estimated weight is around 9,000 pounds.

Measuring mesquite tree trunk The tree measured at around 9,000 pounds, 15'6" long and a diameter that ranged from 23 - 42".

Measurements of the log put it at 15'6" long, with a top diameter ranging from 23" to 42". A typical mesquite log, Bob said, would get to about eight or 10 feet long before “burling out, branching out.”

This big one does have many burls but, unlike in other wood species, the large rounded outgrowths are actually a desirable aspect of mesquite. “A lot of woodworkers and furniture makers, like on the East Coast, strive to find lumber that doesn’t have voids or knots,” Bob said. “With mesquite, you’re looking for the voids and knots.”

Mesquite Burl fills those divots with a black epoxy — occasionally with turquoise mixed in — “which makes a beautiful pattern,” Bob said. “When we cut into it,” the big log “will probably become some of the most gorgeous boards made from mesquite,” he said.

Mesquite lumber laid out for drying The mesquite lumber is rough-cut and laid out on pallets, stacked and sticked, then moved into the kiln to be dried.

The company has not yet cut the large log because they’re waiting for a customer, who might have a specific vision for a project that would affect how the boards are cut. Bob expects the wood to be suitable for fine furniture, rather than the flooring, mantels or basic lumber many of the mesquite trees they process become. When it’s cut, it’ll either go into the hot-air kiln, where the moisture content of 40 to 60 percent will get reduced to nine or 10 percent in a couple of months, or the vacuum kiln, where the moisture content reduction takes place in about 10 days.

For more information on the big mesquite log, call 512-930-2875 or visit www.mesquiteburl.com.

posted on December 1, 2009 by Joanna Takes
previous post next post
Comments

What People are Saying:

I have been ordering from Rockler for almost 20 years and have found their products to be very inexpensive and of high quality. Shipping is fast even when an item is back ordered. The best prices I have found anywhere."

- Orval - 08/07/2012

What People are Saying:

I have been ordering from Rockler for almost 20 years and have found their products to be very inexpensive and of high quality. Shipping is fast even when an item is back ordered. The best prices I have found anywhere."

- Orval - 08/07/2012
Feedback X