Bits, Blades & Cutters

  • June 12, 2014
    by Rockler

    Whether you call it a miter saw, cutoff saw or chop saw, this type of machine is built to cut wood to finished length, an operation that involves cutting across the grain. So you know you'll want a crosscut blade, whose high tooth count and knife-like alternating-top-bevel tooth shape can yield an almost polished-looking surface. You'll also probably want a thin-kerf blade to reduce the burden on the saw's motor and to get the greatest possible yield from your stock.
  • June 12, 2014
    by Rockler

    You can have the biggest, best table saw on the market but still get lackluster or even lousy cuts if the blade is mediocre or wrong for the job. Often the blades that ship with table saws are serviceable, but you typically can get a big boost in performance by upgrading to an aftermarket blade.
  • June 12, 2014
    by Rockler

    Making smooth, safe cuts with your table saw, radial-arm saw, chop saw or sliding compound miter saw depends on having the right blade for the tool and for the type of cut you want to make.
  • October 24, 2013
    by Rockler

    Helpful tips from the pros so every cut with your router bit is a clean cut.
  • October 24, 2013
    by Rockler

    Using the right router bit for your project is essential. Now you can use our beginner's guide to choosing router bits to help you learn more about all the router bits available and find the one you need easily.
  • August 14, 2013
    by Ralph Bagnall

    When making custom windows, Freud's 99-050 and 99-051 Window Sash & Rail Router Bit pairing require more work, but the extra effort is well worth it.
  • May 9, 2013
    by Rockler

    Before you buy a raised panel router bit, there are a few things you should know to help choose the best type for your style and projects.
  • April 24, 2013
    by Rockler

    Horizontal and Vertical raised panel bits have their advantages and disadvantages, so we try to help you understand the differences.
  • December 1, 2011
    by Chris Marshall

    Using a simple trammel jig and some MDF wood you can start a fun trivet project that will make some nice holiday gifts.
  • December 1, 2011
    by Woodworker's Journal

    Drill bits and scrap wood can help you determine proper bit height before you start routing.
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What People are Saying:

I have been ordering from Rockler for almost 20 years and have found their products to be very inexpensive and of high quality. Shipping is fast even when an item is back ordered. The best prices I have found anywhere."

- Orval - 08/07/2012

What People are Saying:

I have been ordering from Rockler for almost 20 years and have found their products to be very inexpensive and of high quality. Shipping is fast even when an item is back ordered. The best prices I have found anywhere."

- Orval - 08/07/2012
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