Top Trim Routing Techniques: Mortising Inlays
posted on December 1, 2010 by Chris Marshall
Cutting mortise inlays Cutting thin, flush inlays requires small cuts and precision, which makes the trim router the perfect tool for this job.

Inlays require a shallow excavation to seat them flush with the surrounding wood. You can get the job done with other routers too, but a trim router is my first choice. Its small size offers several advantages for precision work like this. Trimmers are much lighter weight than mid-size machines, so you can guide them right up to a knifed outline of your inlay with better control. I use a 1/8" or 1/4" straight or spiral bit. If you have a steady hand and a good eye, there’s no need for a template here; just guide the machine freehand. And, if you’re mortising a narrow apron or small box side, a trim router’s little footprint really helps. A few new machines, like RIDGID’s Model R2401, even have an LED light to brighten up the cutting area — and that’s a big bonus for this sort of exacting work.

posted on December 1, 2010 by Chris Marshall
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