$139.99 Each
In stock

Leave a silky finish with this premium smooth plane, featuring gorgeous sapele handles and solid brass fixings.

Bench DogĀ® Tools No. 4 Smoothing Plane

Item #
58837
Rating:
86% of 100
Bench Dog® Tools No. 4 Smoothing Plane Bench Dog® Tools No. 4 Smoothing Plane Introduction to Hand Planes | Woodworking Tools
Bench Dog® Tools No. 4 Smoothing Plane

Bench Dog's No. 4 smoother takes the thinnest of shavings for an exceptionally fine finish. Used skillfully, it can be the final step before finishing, and it also makes a good general-purpose plane or first plane for your collection. Quality materials, precision machining and solid construction result in a hand plane that's an absolute pleasure to use. The sole is precision ground flat. The blade is made from thick 1/8'' hardened carbon steel for reduced chatter and excellent edge retention. Solid sapele is used for the comfortable tote and knob, adding a touch of elegance. Each plane includes a case, sock, manual and a Certificate of Inspection with measurements specific to your plane for sole flatness and blade hardness.

Features:

  • Ideal for surface finishing and final smoothing
  • Ductile cast iron body for superior strength and resistance to impact
  • Adjustable frog lets you narrow the blade opening for fine shavings
  • Easy depth-of-cut adjustment and lateral blade adjustment
  • Solid brass cap iron and threaded fittings for smooth action
  • Sole of plane and back of blade are flat to tight tolerances
  • Blade and sole are treated with a protective layer of oil
  • Certificate of Inspection included for each tool
  • Minimal setup and tuning required before use

(1) Bench Dog® Tools No. 4 Smoothing Plane
(1) Plane sock
(1) Black storage case
(1) Certificate of Inspection
(1) Owner's manual

More Information
Brand Bench Dog
Manufacturer Part Number 250055
Weight 5.4000
Tech Spec
  • Plane Model: No. 4 Smooth Plane
  • Plane Weight: 4.18 pounds
  • Sole Flatness: 0.002'' to 0.004'' tolerance
  • Sole Length: 10''
  • Sole Width: 2-1/2''
  • Blade Width: 2''
  • Blade Thickness: About 1/8''
  • Blade Bevel Angle: 25°
  • Blade Bevel Up/Down: Down
  • Blade Hardness: 55-60 HRC
  • Frog/Blade Seat Angle: 45°
  • Tote and Knob Material: Sapele
  • Body Material: Cast iron
  • Blade Material: Hardened carbon steel
  • Lever Cap Material: Brass
Technical Documents
Type Smoothing Planes
Prop 65 WarningWARNING: Cancer & Reproductive Harm - www.P65Warnings.ca.gov

Prop 65 WarningWARNING: Drilling, sawing, sanding or machining wood products can expose you to wood dust, a substance known to the State of California to cause cancer. Avoid inhaling wood dust or use a dust mask or other safeguards for personal protection. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov/wood.
4.3 / 5.0
3 Reviews
5 Stars
4 Stars
3 Stars
2 Stars
1 Star
1
2
0
0
0
Five stars for the category.
I’ve given up on the Chinese stuff. Even when you get them dialed in they don’t hold up and frankly, so far, the workmanship is just something I can’t live with. This is my third Bench Dog plane and for the money, they can’t be beat. You can see handwork for final finishing, good polish and durable, good quality materials. I spent about an hour touching up the sole with a bit of a polish so it runs smoother and put a good edge on the blade. Some light machine oil and it was soon performing 100 percent. I have a 4 1/2 but this 4 is lighter, a bit smaller and certainly I handier. I’m tending to use the 4 1/2 for heavier work. The 4 seems able to handle any job, from something small (1/4” box sides) to bigger jointing type work. Get it on sale and you score even bigger! Roy, Advanced Hobbiest Woodworker
April 5, 2019
Purchased
1 month ago
Woodworking Experience:
Advanced
No 4 Hand Plane
I'm a quadriplegic and hobbyist. I have been woodworking off and on all my life (I'm 62) and fairly steadily for about ten years. My background is in engineering and as a mechanic and carpenter - I've worked with tools all my life.

My Planes (I also have the Bench Dog Block plane) are very nicely machined and met all specifications right from the box. I sharpened both planes and can produce very fine curls. I'm not very strong but have learned these tools can be a real asset in my shop. They are beautifully made, fit the hand well, and are predictable and controllable.

I only put 4 stars on them only because I've never used premium planes but as well as these work I'd be very surprised if there was a significant improvement. I'f I can get good results anyone can.
March 5, 2019
Woodworking Experience:
Intermediate
Bench Dog #4 Smoothing Plane
I'm a hobbyist and currently own 7 different hand planes, all of which are made in Asia. I don't own any high end planes. So keep this in mind regarding my opinion. I received my #4 this week and today I tried it out. The workmanship and quality of the plane in this price range is better than any of the planes I currently own. I have a #62 Stanley Sweetheart jack plane and I'd say the Bench Dog #4 is a significantly higher quality tool. Though the Stanley is tuned and performs well, the Bench Dog exceeds in overall quality. As for performance, out of the box, the blade was about as dull as a butter knife. I must have spent about 2 hours flattening the back of the blade. I was not able to get a polished surface like I thought I should. No matter how long I spent, I could not polish the surface evenly. I proceeded to sharpen the primary and secondary bevels. I tried out the plane at that point and found the performance to be very disappointing. I decided to flatten the sole which actually went pretty quickly. I used 150 and 220 grit sandpaper on the top of my tablesaw. I gave the plane another test and it did amazingly well. I got a beautiful ribbon which measured about .002".
Honestly, for the price and the quality of the plane, I'd expect I'd have to spend some time tuning it. The documentation that came with it even said so. The part that sort of bothers me is Rockler makes really high claims about the sharpness etc of this plane out of the box. That was not my experience. In the the end. I'm actually very happy with the plane and believe it was a good purchase.
February 8, 2019
Purchased
2 months ago
Woodworking Experience:
Intermediate
Start typing your question and we'll check if it was already asked and answered. Learn More
Browse 2 questions Browse 2 questions and 11 answers
Why did you choose this?
Rockler Store
Could not resist, with the sale.
Michael C on Mar 27, 2019
I wanted a high quality Bench Plane.
Christopher H on Mar 12, 2019
Could not resist, with the sale.
Michael C on Mar 27, 2019
price and quality
William H on Mar 22, 2019
I wanted a high quality Bench Plane.
Christopher H on Mar 12, 2019
Always wanted a quality plane
Nathan G on Mar 9, 2019
I'm setting up my first woodworking shop and thought this would be a good starter plane. Bring on the lumber!
Barry B on Mar 7, 2019
Chosen for its quality and sale price!
TARA S on Mar 1, 2019
HUBBY WANTS FOR CHRISTMAS
JENNIFER H on Nov 20, 2018
This is on my son's Christmas list.
Marcia J on Nov 20, 2018
I want to use the hand plane a lot more. I have a Stanley Sweetheart Low Angle Jack Plane, a Stanley Low Angle Block Plane and this will complete my picture for planing and smoothing boards. Next I'll be working at acquiring a good shoulder plane. At present I use my table saw for tenons. I want to do a better job on the tenons. I'll get there, be the Good Lord willing and the creek don't rise.
William S on Nov 19, 2018
Buying my first plane and they say a #4 is the best place to start.
DAN S on Nov 18, 2018
price and quality
William H on Mar 22, 2019
Always wanted a quality plane
Nathan G on Mar 9, 2019
Why does the #4 Smoothing Plane work better than the #5 Jack Plane for final soothing of a surface? -- Or does it? The only difference in specs is the sole length and weight. The Sole length for the smoothing plane is 10 inches and for the Jack Plane is 14". The jack plane, being longer, is a little heavier. The sole width, blade width, blade thickness and material, bevel angle, and frog/blade angle are all identical. Given that the blade bevel and frog angle are the same, it seems the jack plane should be able to cut just as fine and smooth a surface as the smoothing plain. Please explain. Am I missing something? Thanks
Robert G on Nov 4, 2018
BEST ANSWER: It has to do with the length of the sole. The longer the sole, the more it will ride over small imperfections rather than smooth them out